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Results 1 - 10 out of 10

Analysis | Nov 13, 2019
The former U.S. officials examine catalytic episodes in history and the choices late Cold War and post-Cold War leaders were faced with in those critical moments.
Analysis | Oct 01, 2019
Historian Mark Smith’s provocative book won’t give the U.S. a policy to manage its relationship with Russia, but it does offer some valuable guidance in thinking about strategic solutions.
Analysis | Sep 18, 2019
Corruption is a feature, not a bug, of the Russian political system, and self-enrichment is crucial to understanding why Russia’s leaders make the decisions that they do, Aslund argues in his new book.
Analysis | Apr 23, 2019
A highly readable and informative new book sheds light on a woefully understudied topic—the relationship between Russia’s Orthodox Church and its military—while raising many questions worthy of further study.
Analysis | Apr 04, 2019
Angela Stent clearly lays out Russia’s strategic imperatives and the mindset of Putin and his circle to present a coherent, compelling analysis of contemporary Russian behavior in the world.
Analysis | Mar 22, 2019
In his new book, one of post-Soviet Russia’s most enduring liberal politicians describes the emergence of his country’s current system of governance and predicts its impending doom.
Analysis | Mar 12, 2019
William Burns’ new book describes his warnings to the Bush administration that pushing for NATO membership for Georgia and Ukraine would spur Moscow to use armed force in the former and to meddle in Crimea and eastern Ukraine.
Analysis | Feb 15, 2019
Russia and China are two key players in a new Eurasia. In the book reviewed here, Bruno Maçães argues that this supercontinent is the most salient feature of an emerging new world order.
Analysis | Jan 03, 2019
In the 1990s, preserving NATO and, with it, U.S. preeminence in Europe became the sine qua non of U.S. European policy. Is this why Russia was left out of Europe’s post-Cold War security structure?
Analysis | Mar 03, 2017
Four eminent Russia experts—James Goldgeier, Rajan Menon, Condoleezza Rice and Angela Stent—review Columbia professor Robert Legvold’s new book.